Webb Telescope Image Reveal

Tonight at 5pm the Biden administration will release the first image from the Webb telescope with a flurry releases starting tomorrow.

The Webb telescope is interesting because it has been positioned in the L2 Sun-Earth Lagrange point which is an area of space that is essentially protected from our cosmic ‘weather’ and events allowing it to be a static location from which to base our photos and research. Its located at 1.5M miles from Earth.

You will be able to see the first images at http://www.nasa.gov/webbfirstimages

You can find out more about the Webb telescope at https://jwst.nasa.gov

There will also be coverage at NASA TV.

Here is the official schedule as we know it today:

Monday, July 11

5 p.m. – President Joe Biden will release one of Webb’s first images in a preview event at the White House in Washington. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson will provide remarks. A live stream of the event will be available on NASA TV. The image will be available simultaneously on NASA’s website.

Tuesday, July 12 (Image Release Day)

9:45 a.m. – Live, opening remarks by agency and Webb leadership will air on NASA TV, the NASA app, and the agency’s website ahead of the first images release.

10:30 a.m. – Live coverage of the image release broadcast will air on NASA TV, the NASA app, and the agency’s website. The public also can watch live on FacebookTwitterYouTubeTwitch, and Daily Motion.

12:30 p.m. – Following the live broadcast, NASA and its partners will hold a joint media briefing at NASA Goddard. The briefing will livestream on NASA TV, the NASA app, and the agency’s website. Participants include:

Eric Smith, Webb program scientist and Astrophysics Division chief scientist, NASA Headquarters

Knicole Colón, Webb deputy project scientist for exoplanet science, NASA Goddard

René Doyon, principal investigator for the Canadian Near-Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph, University of Montreal

Christopher Evans, Webb project scientist, ESA

Klaus Pontoppidan, Webb project scientist, STScI

Jane Rigby, Webb operations project scientist, NASA Goddard

Amber Straughn, Webb deputy project scientist for communications, NASA Goddard

In-person registration is closed; media may register to participate virtually by completing this form by 3 p.m. Monday, July 11.

3 p.m. – Live Interview Opportunities: From 3 to 7 p.m., Webb mission experts will be available to conduct live, remote interviews with broadcast media, in both English and Spanish. Details about scheduling these interviews are available online. Members of the media seeking interviews outside of the windows mentioned in this advisory should complete this media interview request form.

NASA’s media accreditation policy for on-site and virtual activities is available online. The agency will soon provide further details to those who register their interest, including COVID-19 safety protocols. Due to space limitations, NASA may be unable to accommodate all requests for on-site attendance. Media and members of the public may ask questions on social media using #UnfoldtheUniverse.

Wednesday, July 13

6 a.m. – Live Interview Opportunities: From 6 a.m. to 1 p.m., Webb mission experts will be available to conduct live, remote interviews with broadcast media, in both English and Spanish. Details about scheduling these interviews are available online. Members of the media seeking interviews outside of the windows mentioned in this advisory should complete this media interview request form.

1 p.m.: NASA en español social media event

NASA will broadcast a live social media event in Spanish on its NASA en español YouTubeFacebook, and Twitter accounts. Webb experts Begoña Vila and Néstor Espinoza will discuss the release of the first images and take questions from followers.

3 p.m.: NASA Science Live

Webb experts will answer questions about the first images and data in a NASA Science Live show. The broadcast, Webb’s First Full-Color Images Explained, will air live on the NASA Science Live website, as well as YouTubeFacebook, and Twitter. Viewers of this episode can submit questions on social media using the hashtag #UnfoldtheUniverse or by leaving a comment in the chat section of the Facebook or YouTube stream.

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One thought on “Webb Telescope Image Reveal”

  1. The images are just amazing. What is also very interesting is the fact that we can remotely control and manage the Webb telescope at over 1 million miles away. Talking about lights-out operations!

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